Curated by_Adrian Notz

Opening: Thursday, Sept 14, 2017, 6 pm 
Sept 15, 2017 - Nov 04, 2017

  • Installation view, curated by_Adrian Notz
  • Installation view, curated by_Adrian Notz
  • Carlos Amorales, Learn To Fuck Yourself, detail, gouache on paper, 2017
  • Installation view, curated by_Adrian Notz
  • Installation view, curated by_Adrian Notz
  • Carlos Amorales, Learn To Fuck Yourself, detail, gouache on paper, 2017

«While Mr. Schulze is reading, the Balkan train crosses the bridge at Nisch, a pig whines in the cellar of the butcher Nuttke.»

On April 12, 1918 Richard Huelsenbeck presented his «Dadaist Manifesto» in Berlin. In it, he defines the «simultaneous poem» with the sentence which gives the exhibition its title. The idea of simultaneity represents life «as a simultaneous whirl of noises, colors, and spiritual rhythms [...] that is taken over in all its brutal reality.» As the "highest art", the "simultaneous poem" is capable of presenting the complexity and "the thousendfold issues of the day".
 It is criticism of an epistemically effective ordered succession. The simultaneity and dispersion of the characters question the construction of narrations as stories - and thus also of history, which is organized visually and linguistically. According to this perspective, the work of the three positions can also be considered as alternative historiography, alternative canon, new language.
The «Romanum Belvedere» of the Museum of Antiquity goes back to Pope Julius II, who placed the Apollo statue in the Vatican Garden in 1503. Further statues were placed afterwards so that the «Romanum Belvedere» turned into an open air cabinet of curiosities. The antiquity was discovered then, and classified into Roman, Greek, Egyptian and Prehistoric. «Romanum Belvedere» marked a beginning, it depicts the moment when art historiography was established. This shows that History is also just a story.
While thanks to statues antiquity was rediscovered in art, it was banned from every day life. Latin was replaced by vernacular, and became a dead classical language. After the language change the nature of grotesque was celebrated in the cabinet of curiosities with the popular laughter culture and a carnivalesque perception of the world. AES + F refer to this carnivalesque perception, in which the revaluation of all values and mesaliances between the profane and the sacred dominate. With «Inverso Mundus», they transfer this fantasy to the present, in which utopias change into hyperreal grotesques.
While AES + F transform this inverted world into a contemporary digital aesthetic, Carlos Amorales creates a completely new language with his shapeless forms of the Xerographies especially created for this exhibition. The forms, which in contrast to his earlier works have not been created by abstraction, but are fictitious, offer a new and non-objecvtive character system. Amorales uses them as artistic elements in images, as letters, as musical notes, and even as instruments. The viewer, reader or musician is not only challenged to read or play a shape, but also to construe it aesthetically. In this way, the forms yield a language leaving room for "inventio" by way of its indeterminate nature.