Andras J. Nagy - Early Photography

Opening: Wednesday, Jan 25, 2017, 7 pm 
Jan 25, 2017 - March 25, 2017

  • András J. Nagy, I see you... Litle USA, 27.9x35.4cm, 2004
  • András J. Nagy, Stalled USA, 27.9x35.4cm, 2003
  • András J. Nagy, Deceive (USA), 27.9x35.4 cm, 2008
  • András J. Nagy, Park for...(USA), 27.9x35.4 cm, 2003.
  • András J.Nagy, Tension on 42nd (USA), 27.9x35.4 cm, 2004
  • András J. Nagy, Fallen Soldiers (USA), 27.6x35.6 cm, 2002
  • András J. Nagy, Behind the BMCA (USA), 27.9x35.4 cm, 2003
  • András J. Nagy, Suspicious Package (USA), 27.9x35.4 cm, 2003
  • András J.Nagy, On a Pole (USA), 27.9x35.4 cm, 2003
  • András J. Nagy, Human Error (USA), 27.7x35.5 cm, 2001
  • András J. Nagy, Ivy League Lies (USA), 27.6x35.6 cm, 2002
  • András J. Nagy, Herzogs House (USA), 27.9x35.4 cm, 2008
  • András J. Nagy, Gone Now (USA), 27.9x35.4 cm, 2003
  • András J.Nagy, Wax Figure (USA), 27.9x35.4cm, 2004

András J. Nagy was born in Hungary and grew up in South Bronx and South Brooklyn. When he was eight years old he began to photograph Graffitis with the Leica M4 of his father. Nagy lived in Rotterdam, Los Angeles, Osaka and New York. Today he lives and works in Budapest. 

His works at the current exhibition are results of photographic journeys through the United States, Columbia, Montenegro, Estonia and Hungary that took place in 2002. All the works of the exhibiton are unique, there are no negatives. 

Nagy tries to hold transient moments: a banker walking on Lexington Avenue with a huge packet under his arms, an empty cemetery in Hungary under a rainy sky, a tourist at the cash machine, an abandoned industrial building. Nagy photographs landscapes, buildings, interpersonal situations that he crosses by during his travels. He records different realities, fears, pleasures and weaknesses of the society. He shows social needs and dreams. Besides ordinary situations and trivial places Nagy shows something else in his photography: the narrative character through which the viewer is moved into the situation. That’s why Nagys photographs work outside time, space and context. 

By mixing architectural, figural and scenic photography he breaks with the strictly separated genres of the classical modernism. His works belong to the genre of street photography, which is related to photojournalism and documentary photography, and is as old as the medium of photography itself.